What is Modern Day Slavery?

 

Slavery exists on every continent, in almost every country. It comes in many forms, including trafficking, child marriage, debt bondage, and forced labor.

In whatever form, all victims lack one thing—freedom.

 
 
 

From the Virginian teenager kidnapped and taken away from everything she knows to the Cambodian child forced to marry a man seven times her age, slavery plagues our world. 

 
 

When someone is coerced, forced, or deceived into prostitution or forced labor, that person is a victim of trafficking.

Some people are lured into slavery by a person they are romantically involved with. Others are tricked with false promises of a dream job. And, others are forced to sell their bodies by parents trapped in poverty.

Many high school and college students use social media to recruit fellow students into situations of sex trafficking.

Long-term consequences of sex trafficking include physical and psychological trauma, disease, drug addiction, unintended pregnancy, malnutrition, social ostracism, and even death.

Traffickers often promise their slaves freedom if they pay a debt—a false debt that is made up by the trafficker, a debt that never goes away, a debt that keeps a human a slave.

While many of us look forward to job promotions, sex trafficking victims have a different idea of what promotion means. To those trafficked, a promotion means the “opportunity” to recruit or transport other victims.

 
 

 
 

Who is Enslaved?

 

 

30M

people in the world today are slaves.

24M

are women and children.

12M

are underage children.

 
 

The average age of a modern day slave is 12 years old. That’s right. 12. An age when most of us were in middle school, looking forward to becoming teenagers. But these children are just trying to survive every minute, every day.

Enslaved women and children struggle to live normal lives. Some struggle when they’re forced to prostitute themselves. Others struggle as they work without pay. They live in constant fear—fear of those who hold power over them, fear of what the next day holds. They struggle to have hope.